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Stock Assessment to Improve Management for Sharks

Publications

Authors in bold are staff of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science

2009
Chapman, D., Babcock, E.A., Gruber, S.H. , DiBattista, J.D., Franks, B.R., Kessel, S.A., Guttridge, T., Pikitch, E.K., Feldheim, K.A.. 2009. Long-term natal site-fidelity by immature lemon sharks. Molecular Ecology. 18, 3500–3507.
Read full study in Molecular Ecology
Read press release.

2007
Babcock, E.A., McAllister, M.K., E.K. Pikitch. 2007. Comparison of Harvest Control Policies for Rebuilding Overfished Populations within a Fixed Rebuilding Time Frame. North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 27:1326-1342. -

Abstract: U.S. law requires that overfished fish populations be rebuilt within 10 years when biologically possible, and otherwise within the time it would take to rebuild in the absence of fishing plus one mean generation time (MGT). Most overfished populations can recover in less than 10 years; the exceptions are populations with very low productivity and some that are severely depleted. A range of harvest control policies, including constant fishing mortalities and variable harvest rate control rules, were compared in terms of their ability to rebuild overfished populations of five species within the required times. The North Atlantic swordfish Xiphias gladius and Gulf of Mexico red snapper Lutjanus campechanus populations were able to rebuild in 10 years, but the white marlin Tetrapturus albidus, sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus, and darkblotched rockfish Sebastes crameri populations were not. The harvest policy that resulted in populations being rebuilt most rapidly was either a control rule that reduced fishing mortality with decreasing biomass or a constant harvest rate designed to meet the current rebuilding time requirement. The control rules we analyzed restricted catches at the beginning of the rebuilding period but allowed catches to increase rapidly as the population was rebuilt. Thus, there was a trade-off between relatively high catches early in the rebuilding period and high catches later in the rebuilding period when the population had been rebuilt and could sustain high catches. Whether the population was rebuilt more rapidly under a fixed rebuilding-time requirement or a control rule depended on the productivity of the population.

Received: April 26, 2006; Accepted: April 2, 2007; Published Online: November 15, 2007

DOI: 10.1577/M06-124.1
North American Journal of Fisheries Management 2007;27:1326–1342

* Corresponding author: ebabcock@rsmas.miami.edu

2005
Babcock E A, E Cortes. 2005. Surplus production model applied to the data for blue and mako sharks available at the 2001 ICCAT Bycatch Working Group and other published data. Collective Volume of Scientific Papers ICCAT . 58(3):1044-1053.

2004
Apostolaki P, E Cortes, E A Babcock, E Brooks, L Beerkircher. 2004. Use of an age-structured model for the stock assessment of blue shark in the North Atlantic. Collective Volume of Scientific Papers ICCAT . 58(3):1001-1018.

Apostolaki P, E A Babcock, M K McAllister. 2004. Further investigation of the effects of stock mixing on estimates of the size of North Atlantic bluefin tuna population using the six-area population dynamics model presented in SCRS/02/88. Collective Volume of Scientific Papers ICCAT. 56(3):1121-1133.

Babcock E A, E Cortes. 2004. Surplus production model applied to the data for blue and mako sharks available at the 2001 ICCAT Bycatch Working Group and other published data. ICCAT document. SCRS/2004/109.

Skomal G, E A Babcock, E K Pikitch. 2004. Indices of blue and mako shark abundance derived from U. S. Atlantic recreational fishery data. Collective Volume of Scientific Papers ICCAT . 58(3):1034-1043.

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